Gold Coast Diasporas: Identity, Culture, and Power (Blacks by Walter C. Rucker

By Walter C. Rucker

Although they got here from particular polities and peoples who spoke diverse languages, slaves from the African Gold Coast have been jointly pointed out by way of Europeans as "Coromantee" or "Mina." Why those ethnic labels have been embraced and the way they have been used by enslaved Africans to enhance new staff identities is the topic of Walter C. Rucker’s soaking up examine. Rucker examines the social and political elements that contributed to the production of latest global ethnic identities and assesses the methods displaced Gold Coast Africans used known rules approximately strength as a method of knowing, defining, and resisting oppression. He explains how appearing Coromantee and Mina id concerned a standard set of matters and the construction of the ideological guns essential to face up to the slavocracy. those guns integrated obeah powders, charms, and potions; the evolution of "peasant" realization and the ennoblement of universal humans; more and more competitive monitors of masculinity; and the empowerment of ladies as leaders, spiritualists, and warriors, all of which marked sharp breaks or reformulations of styles of their Gold Coast past.

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Gold Coast Diasporas: Identity, Culture, and Power (Blacks in the Diaspora)

Even supposing they got here from designated polities and peoples who spoke varied languages, slaves from the African Gold Coast have been jointly pointed out via Europeans as "Coromantee" or "Mina. " Why those ethnic labels have been embraced and the way they have been used by enslaved Africans to enhance new team identities is the topic of Walter C.

Extra resources for Gold Coast Diasporas: Identity, Culture, and Power (Blacks in the Diaspora)

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39 They developed ideas of liberty and autonomy that favored the corporate or collective over the individual. Moreover, the very paths Coromantees and (A)minas took to obtain freedom, autonomy, and sovereignty were facilitated and informed by Atlantic African rather than European contexts and cultural technologies. In sum, Gold Coast commoners remembered their natal homes and thus drew from memories of Atlantic Africa to confront the harsh and suffocating realities of Western Hemisphere slavery.

In this case, these three men may have combined the roles of town leaders, with the political authority to make a binding oath with a foreign nation, and commercial agents. Caboceers also had other roles and connotations. In his reflections on Gold Coast religion in the eighteenth century, Rømer describes one informant named Caboceer Putti who was the chief priest (obosomfo or okomfo) of the “most important oracle on the Gold Coast” at the Ga-speaking town of Labadi. Either Putti (Okpoti) was both a priest and a caboceer or, as Rømer intimates, he was a caboceer because he was a chief priest.

Denkyira, and west of Akyem, Adanse’s central locale in what became the Akan heartland perhaps explains its central place in oral traditions as the home of most Akan clans. Adanse appears in a number of oral histories, and now in written accounts by professional historians, as one of the five great towns of pre-Atlantic Akan-speaking states. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century map makers frequently located “Acanij” or “Akanni”—the alleged home of the Akani or Akanist community of gold merchants—at or near Adanse.

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